Category Archives: Garden Tips

September Tips

Fall is a great time to plant trees, shrubs, bareroot perennials and bulbs.

Start pansy & viola seed for bloom next spring

Watch your compost pile. This is a good time to add an activator for brown leaves & lawn trimmings

Check your lawn for grub activity. Sure signs are brown patches of lawn with turf that you can peel back. Another sign is increased activity of skunks, raccoons and moles in your lawn. Treat with dylox, oftanol or diazinon to eliminate grubs.

Plant spring flowering bulbs. Plan on the end of this month. Fertilize and water in well.

Plant fall pansy, flowering cabbage and kale. They all love the cooler night temps that come with autumn in New England.

Fall is a great time to seed or re-seed your lawn. Keep grass seed moist until germination occurs. Add weed-free straw or salt marsh hay to hold seed in place.

Preparing Your Fall Garden Beds

Are you overloaded with new ideas for perennial beds and borders after visiting friends or public display gardens? Seen lots of unfamiliar and interesting new plants at the nursery? If so, fall is an excellent time to prepare fall garden beds for planting now or in the spring. The cooler temperatures, weaker sunlight and shorter days of fall mean less energy goes into top growth and more into establishing a strong root system. Planting in this area can usually continue through October.

After choosing the proper plants for your location-taking into account plant hardiness and the amount of available light-the most important thing you can do to insure success is to properly prepare your soil.

After marking off the area, you need to rid it of perennial weeds. Rototilling will only increase your weed crop, so you will need to carefully pull all underground stems and roots. Be sure to also remove any additional roots you find when you turn the soil over.

The soil you’re aiming to create should hold moisture, but also be well drained. If it doesn’t drain well now, it probably has high clay content. The actual soil particles are very small and pack together very closely, suffocating and drowning plant roots. Adding gypsum to clay soil can help break it up.

If your soil drains very quickly and you need to water frequently, it is probably sandy. Soil particles are relatively large and fit together loosely. Plants rarely drown in sandy soil unless the area is low-lying or the water line is high. In this instance it would be best to make a raised bed.

The solution, both for maintaining good drainage, and moisture retention, is generous amounts of organic matter. It separates clay particles, creating air space, and holds water and nutrients in sand. Good sources of organic matter are finished compost, well-decomposed manure, leaf mold and damp peat moss. These should be incorporated into the soil when it is turned over to a depth of 12″ or more. At this time you can also remove any sizable rocks, roots or other debris.

Most perennials grow best in a soil that is slightly acid to almost neutral-a pH of about 5.5-6.5. Most soils in this area are probably very acid and will need to have lime added every 2-3 years.

If you prefer to estimate your fertilizer needs, there are a few things to keep in mind. Phosphorous, and some of the trace elements, even when present in the soil in sufficient quantities, are only available to plants within a fairly narrow pH range. Keeping your soil pH at 5.5-6.5 should be adequate for most plants.

Fertilizers can either be natural, or you can use dry or granular fertilizers that are either quick or slow release. You can use either type if you are going to plant now. If you are going to delay planting until spring, wait and add the fertilizer then unless you are using natural fertilizers which break down slowly and will not leach out readily.

Natural fertilizers should be incorporated into the soil when you turn it over, especially phosphorous (bone meal, rock phosphate), as it doesn’t move readily through the soil. Dry or granular fertilizers can be sprinkled on the surface and raked into the top few inches of soil.

Happy Planting!

Window Box Color All Year Round

It’s always a shame that just when your window box has reached their peak of fullness and color, autumn sneaks in and nips at the foliage and flowers, signaling it’s time to clean them out. Or is it? This season, try extending the life of your window boxes, so you can appreciate their beauty year-round, each time you glance out your winter windows.

To spruce up your boxes, start by removing what looks old and tired: the geranium leaves are beginning to yellow, the verbena is way past its prime, and the dianthus isn’t flowering anymore. But the ageratum seems to be perking up now that the heat of summer has passed, and the ivy and vinca are holding their own. You can fill in gaps with cool season flowers such as mums and pansies and probably get another three weeks of flowering out of those boxes.

When freezing temperatures arrive, it’s time for flowering brassicas, such as kale and cabbage, with their colorful, curious foliage. Plant them directly into the boxes and they will last all winter long through the harshest of weather. As you plant, tuck daffodil and tulip bulbs under the flowering kale to guarantee an early spring show. You can mix in cut sprigs of crabapples, viburnums, winterberry, or any other shrub or tree with clusters of colorful berries and strong branches. Just stick the branches into the soil in the boxes, and your only problem will be the birds and wildlife competing for the berries! Tangled grapevines and bittersweet, with its orange seed coats and red berries, quickly go from noxious weeds growing in the wild to precious commodities in autumn and winter window boxes.

Evergreen branches from spruce, balsam, and fir will retain their color throughout the winter months as long as the temperature is low. Stick their ends into the soil just before the soil freezes, arranging them en masse. For the holidays, string little white lights through the boughs and tie on weatherproof velvet bows. Discard the branches once the temperatures start to warm, but don’t worry, your window boxes won’t be bare for long. The tulip and daffodil bulbs you carefully tucked in for the winter will soon be coming to life, and the cycle will begin anew.

Reviving Your Lawn

As your lawn endures the trials of job this summer – drought, pestilence and disease – you must hold to the hope that there is a lush, green turf on the other side of this summer.  Has your spring turf been reduced to an arid, brown toasty color?  If not, you might want to submit your water bills for federal disaster relief.  Dry, scorching heat is the perfect scenario for crabgrass to flourish and bluegrass to perish.  What’s needed, of course, is a good, deep penetrating rain.

The large Japanese beetle population will mean a heavier than normal population of grubs.  Knowledge is of course your best defense.  Here are a couple of suggestions for reviving your lawn..

Feeding:  Your lawn’s nitrogen needs are at their highest in late summer.  Avoid fertilizing when temps are about 85 degrees.  Supplement this late summer feed (high in nitrogen) with a fall fertilizer that will concentrate on developing the root system.  This will build a turf more resistant to drought and pest damage.  This might be your most beneficial feeding.  You can supply a fall food right into November in most areas.

Pest Control:  In late summer and early fall the grub cycle begins as the larvae pupate into the common white lawn grub.  At this stage of their development, these grubs are the most vulnerable.  Treat infested areas with either a liquid dose or a granular treatment as either dylox, diazanon or oftanol.

Watering:  A good rule of thumb is to water in the early morning hours.  Try to provide at least 1 to 1.5 inches of water through rainfall or irrigation.  A deep watering once a week is more beneficial than a series of shallow watering.

Seeding:  To repair damage caused by drought,  pests and disease, plan on a fall seeding program.  Match the grass seed varieties to the conditions.  For example, if you have a rocky, sandy soil that doesn’t hold moisture well, use a drought resistant lawn mixture featuring turf-type tall fescues (TTTF).  Unlike ryegrass that spread by shallow rhizomes, TTTF have long individual tap roots.  They are tough, durable and make a long wearing attractive turf.  Heavy clay soils might do better with a bluegrass and ryegrass mixture.  Fall is an optimum time for seeding.  The warm weather speeds germination while the autumn night temps start to drop.  Remember to keep the seed moist until established.  That might require 2-3 mistings during our “Indian Summers”.  The attention you pay to your lawn now will pay big dividends in the fall, the following spring and for years to come.